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Crt Birsa chooses ChamSys for Dubioza Kolektiv at Arsenal Fest

20/08/2021

Robe BMFLs for NCAA March Madness

18/08/2021

Robert John Baker lights “Addams Family” musical with Chauvet

18/08/2021

Claypaky fixtures illuminate “Light Ballet” on Shannon River

17/08/2021

Finland’s biggest music competition picks MDG haze

13/08/2021

Darren Langer chooses Robe for “The Kelly Clarkson Show”

11/08/2021

Robert Juliat Dalis 860 supplied to Scottish Ballet

09/08/2021

DiGiCo Quantum 338 at Montreux Jazz Festival 2021

02/08/2021

Chauvet fixtures used for Alan Jackson benefit concert

22/07/2021

Corona: Special Stryke Percussion indoor show lit with Chauvet

21/07/2021

Elation IP line lights Château de Chambord for French TV show

15/07/2021

Louisville Orchestra and bluegrass band share Chauvet Independence Day rig

14/07/2021

Henk-Jan van Beek setzt Lichtdesign beim Eurovision Song Contest mit Robe um

14/07/2021

James Baker lights „Pippin“ with Chauvet

13/07/2021

Adam Hall unterstützt Ben-Böhmer-Livestream aus dem Kliemannsland

13/07/2021

Robe T2 Profiles specified for ‘Zodiac The Musical’

12/07/2021

Astera AX3s in cross border collaboration

09/07/2021

The Criminal Chaos utilize Chauvet fixtures for music video

09/07/2021

ChamSys console used for 100th anniversary celebration of Third Silesian Uprising

07/07/2021

RCF-Komponenten bei Monheimer Open-Air-Saison-Start im Einsatz

07/07/2021

Kristof Van Mensel selects Astera for Scala & Kolacny Brothers

07/07/2021

Corona: Martin Audio supports return of Japan Jam 2021

06/07/2021

Chauvet Rogue fixtures chosen for Pigeons Playing Ping Pong live show

06/07/2021

Bryson Tiller XR concert created with Robe

06/07/2021

DiGiCo Quantum 7s support BRITS 2021

01/07/2021

Crt Birsa chooses ChamSys for Dubioza Kolektiv at Arsenal Fest

Crt Birsa chooses ChamSys for Dubioza Kolektiv at Arsenal Fest

Crt Birsa of Blackout Lighting Design designed the lightshow for Bosnian stars Dubioza Kolektiv at Arsenal Fest 2021 in Kragujevac, Serbia. Birsa began lighting the band in late 2010. “My show contains ten years of history”, he says. “This is a history that is constantly updated with new ideas for old songs, and also new songs being reflected in new and traditional ways.”

 

For the Arsenal Festival, Birsa called on his ChamSys MagicQ MQ80 console to create the looks in support of the seven-piece band. Coordinating his 150-fixture, 9-universe show with the video designs of Bob Raccoon, he directed beams of light down from the 10-meter high stage roof.

 

Birsa also engaged the crowd with bright colorful audience lighting. “The band-audience communication is very essential”, he says. “The audience is almost part of the show. Because of this, audience lighting is featured in my design. I also use some effects on the crowd.”

 

Given the complexities of the Dubioza Kolektiv show, Birsa said time coding was essential to his plans. “I could not have done things quite this way without timecoding”, he says. “The show would have to be built with much less to it if I had to run everything 100-percent manually.”

 

Birsa tried to complete as much of his show as possible before he got to the festival site. However, intense sunlight forced him to make some late adjustments, working while the temperature outside reached 39° Celsius. He notes that being able to connect the MagicQ MQ80 over a network was essential.

 

“What helped me on the day of the show was morphing the heads on my laptop”, he says. “I was able to import all the colour and beam palettes from other shows with the same lights and then transfer this show to MQ80 and check  the cues with the help of MagicVis on another computer.”

 

(Photos: ChamSys)

 

www.chamsysusa.com

 

Crt Birsa chooses ChamSys for Dubioza Kolektiv at Arsenal FestCrt Birsa chooses ChamSys for Dubioza Kolektiv at Arsenal Fest

Robe BMFLs for NCAA March Madness

Robe BMFLs for NCAA March Madness

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) “March Madness” tournament is a single-elimination college basketball tournament played each spring with 68 teams competing for the national championship. It has been lit - seven courts across six venues in total - for the last three years (preceding 2020 which was canceled due to COVID-19) by Bill Brennan.

 

The 2021 Final Four was staged at the Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana, and Brennan specified 60 x Robe BMFLs - a combination of BMFL Spots and BMFL Blades - for the supplemental rig this year, which were supplied, together with other lights, by Nashville-based Pulse Lighting, whose Paul Hoffman was also the event’s lead lighting programmer.

 

Brennan’s main consideration for lighting the Lucas Oil Stadium was to successfully transform it from a football venue to a basketball court, as well as to satisfy the needs of multiple media organizations. The biggest challenges were balancing the backgrounds and properly managing the daylight spill from the venue, which has a retractable roof and a large retractable window at one end, allowing play both indoors and outdoors.

 

The BMFL Spots were positioned around the field of play and the pitch perimeter and along the team benches, to add ambient ‘fallout’ light for the matches, and for a performance by Miley Cyrus staged during the men’s Final Four section, where she entertained an audience of socially-distanced frontline workers. Lighting was programmed by Paul Hoffman using a GrandMA2.

 

Hoffman was one of seven lighting crew working on the NCAA event. Joining him at the Lucas Oil Stadium were crew chief Andrew Smith plus Dan Grabus and Ryan Chesney. Pulse also supplied equipment for another venue, the Indiana Farmer’s Coliseum, which was crew chiefed by Alex “Herm” Schneider who was also the programmer/operator, working alongside Joel Surbe and Shane Beasley.

 

(Photos: Bill Brennan/Paul Hoffman)

 

www.robe.cz

 

Robe BMFLs for NCAA March MadnessRobe BMFLs for NCAA March Madness

Robert John Baker lights “Addams Family” musical with Chauvet

Robert John Baker was called upon to light “Addams Family”, an Andrew Lippa musical based on the famously eccentric clan, at the historic (121-year old) Casino Theatre in Vandergrift, Pennsylvania.

 

“Before designing this show, I went back and watched some of the old ‘Addams Family’ programs and the film to see the world through their perspective”, he says. “The way they saw the world was quite different than what we deem to be normal. I wanted that to inform my design.”

 

Helping him convey the family’s emotions, while creating a sense of mystery around them were the Chauvet Professional Ovation E-910FC ellipsoidal and Rogue R1X Wash in his rig. The Ovation fixtures were attached to the proscenium and focused on the center stage. “The amber and lime color mixing options in the E-910FC allowed me to create a range of tones”, says Baker. “I also used these fixtures to colorize some of my props, which was essential to evoking different feelings.”

 

Key lighting characters from different angles was a way Baker created an air of mystery and emotion on stage. “Taking a different approach to key lighting was important”, he says. “For example, when Morticia is frustrated with Gomez for keeping secrets, I lit her straight down, creating shadows on her face thus intensifying her look of anger.”

 

At other points in the show, Baker used side lighting to cast shadows on characters such as Lucas and Wednesday, when the couple discussed keeping their marriage a secret. This allowed Pugsley to lurk in the shadows (with the help of a lot of haze), only to emerge later to interrupt their private conversations. In another part the production, when Fester and the ancestors are crossing the stage, Baker relied on up lighting to cast shadows on the cyc behind them, creating the illusion that the number of ghosts present was greater than it appeared.

 

A pair of Rogue R1X Wash fixtures from Baker’s own inventory were instrumental in helping him achieve these effects. “I placed the Rouges in the balcony and used them for face lighting the actors”, he says. “Also, the flexibility of the fixture coupled with the beam angles allowed me to not only wash a group of actors, but also served as a spotlight for several cues in the show.”

 

(Photos: Chauvet Professional)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

Claypaky fixtures illuminate “Light Ballet” on Shannon River

Launched on June 13 and running until 20 June2021, the “Light Ballet” show was presented as part of Brightening Air/Coiscéim Coiligh, a nationwide, ten-day season of arts experiences brought to the public by the Arts Council, Ireland.

 

Produced by Culture Works for Brightening Air, “Light Ballet” transformed the skies and surrounding landscape of eight counties with a light installation floating down the River Shannon over eight days covering almost 200 kilometers. Due to the lighting technology provided by Claypaky’s Sharpy Plus Aqua weatherproof moving head fixtures (IP66-rated), “Light Ballet” was prepared for the elements on the River Shannon and visible from up to seven kilometres.

 

Created by Irish light artist Mick Murray and lighting designer Matthew Cregan of Light Sculptors, the installation was accompanied by a newly composed soundscape by David Kitt. The light installation and soundscape were synchronised in real-time allowing audiences to experience the soundscape at home, along the edge lands or those in-between places through their phones, tablets or computers. Audiences were able to access the soundscape via the Culture Works and Brightening Air website from June 13. The artwork run on a seven-minute cycle for four hours each night from dusk and the full show cycle could be seen at any point along the route.

 

As part of the design process, Murray and Cregan engaged with schools and gave them a worksheet so they could help make the ‘looks’. Murray and Cregan included these looks in the final programming and design and also gave them a palette of colour to work with that they knew would be strong in any light. The array of Sharpy Plus Aqua fixtures for the “Light Ballet” installation was provided by the UK rental company Neg Earth.

 

(Photos: Culture Works/Emilija Jefremova/Mike Nestor)

 

www.claypaky.com

 

Finland’s biggest music competition picks MDG haze

“Uuden Musiikin Kilpailu” (New Music Contest), Finland’s biggest music competition, is an annual event in which Finland’s representative for the Eurovision Song Contest is selected in a live broadcast by Finnish television viewers and an international UMK jury.

 

This year’s Finals on 20 February marked the show’s 10th anniversary. The evening was broadcast live in four languages from Mediapolis TV studios in Tampere and televised on Yle TV1 to an audience of 1.7 million viewers.

 

Lighting designer Pekka Martti of Aku’s Factory turned to MDG haze generators for his lighting design, using its white haze to show a range of visuals that created a different look and mood for each of the seven contestants.

 

Martti selected an MDG ATMe haze generator and an MDG TheOne dual haze and fog generator for this event. He positioned TheOne, set in haze mode, on stage behind the upstage curtain, and placed the ATMe haze machine in the auditorium (there was no live audience due to COVID restrictions). TheOne and the ATMe generators were supplied to Aku’s Factory by MDG’s Finnish distributor, MSonic Oy.

 

(Photos: Ari Levelä/Miika Varila)

www.mdgfog.com

 

Darren Langer chooses Robe for “The Kelly Clarkson Show”

“The Kelly Clarkson Show” (TKCS) is a one hour syndicated daytime show, produced by NBCUniversal Syndication Studios and recorded on Universal Studios in LA’s Stage 1. Darren Langer of DCLighting, a lighting design and direction practice also based in Los Angeles, used several specific Robe products throughout series 1 and 2 of the show - Pointes, BMFL Spots and BMFL Blades, Patt 2013s, Spiiders and Tetra2s.

 

In addition to his own ideas, Langer took initial creative inspiration from production designer James Pearce Connelly and director Joe Terry together with executive producer/showrunner Alex Duda and her producing team, musical director Jason Halbert and the house band. Together they all contributed to setting the tone of the show. With flexibility at the essence of the lighting, “we had capacity to transform instantly from a sharp, animated daytime talk show set to a sexy after-dark ‘musical dream’ at any point”, says Langer.

 

Season 1’s lighting had eight Robe BMFL Blades and eight Pointes permanently installed, and these were augmented with more Robe specials, depending on the songs and action of the day. Frequently used fixtures included Patt 2013s, 15 x Spiiders, and 24 x Tetra2s, all supplied, together with the rest of the lighting equipment, by Illumination Dynamics. Fixture positions varied constantly around the studio, but “these Robes they were fundamental to each show”, says Langer.

 

“We’d often hang the Pointes and even used them as back-light on the artists for creating moody silhouettes and other trick-of-light gags”, he continues. Two RoboSpot systems were being used for the show, both run by Chris Nelson. The BMFL FollowSpots being remote controlled were positioned one over the audience and one above ‘home base’ where host Kelly Clarkson usually sits for interviews, allowing pick ups in any part of the area that the host or guests would generally roam. The two base stations were located side-by-side backstage enabling Nelson to swap between as needed. All the lights in the studio were controlled via a GrandMA2 console.

 

They recorded two shows minimum a day for thirty weeks working three to four days a week, with the lighting rig changing weekly and sometimes daily, de-rigging and re-rigging to get the right fixtures for the specific action each time. With the two performances recorded each day plus guest slots and performances, interviews, demos, games and special themed shows, time was “never on our side”, as Langer puts it.

 

After the timeframe, programming was the next most galvanizing task throughout the two series for which Langer had input from a team over the period comprising Andrew Law, Brian Larsh, Brandon Dunning, Jeff Handke, Felix Peralta and Tyler Glover. The lighting department, with the assistance of technical manager Eric Feder, was also controlling a media server that dictated most of the screen content.

 

Darren Langer and the DCLighting team won the 47th Annual Daytime Emmy for ‘Outstanding Lighting Direction’ for the show in 2020 (for the 2019 broadcast year) and were nominated again for the 48th Annual Daytime Emmy in the same category for the 2020 broadcast year. Furthermore, Langer won the Newscast Broadcast Production Award for ‘Entertainment Lighting Design’ for the show’s 2019 and 2020 broadcast years.

 

He credits his team for their contributions to gaining these accolades, and this includes Kirsty Robson, DCLighting’s VP of Production who handles all the logistics, marketing, communications and client networking, and gaffer Andy Anderson who installs the different lighting designs each day. Andrew Gonzales is their lead tech, looking after the lighting system as well as multitasking as best boy, managing all the rental ‘specials’ in and out daily. Morgan Evans and the late Carlos Colina were also integral to the drafting and visualization part of the process.

 

(Photos: Weiss Eubanks/NBCUniversal Media, LLC)

 

www.robe.cz

 

Robert Juliat Dalis 860 supplied to Scottish Ballet

Robert Juliat Dalis 860 supplied to Scottish Ballet
Robert Juliat Dalis 860 supplied to Scottish Ballet

Scottish Ballet has recently taken possession of a second consignment of Robert Juliat Dalis 860 cyclorama lights bringing its total inventory to twenty-six. The Dalis 860 fixtures were supplied by Adlib’s Glasgow branch. Robert Juliat is distributed exclusively in the UK by Ambersphere Solutions whose Ian Green supported Adlib and the Scottish Ballet in this project.

 

Scottish Ballet’s curved cyclorama is 15 m wide with a 6 m deflection and 7.5 m high. “We positioned the Dalis units just 1.5 m behind the cloth”, says Scottish Ballet’s Technical Director, Matt Strachan. The RJ Dalis 860 cyclorama lights were purchased in two batches in early and mid 2020 to fit budget availability, and each unit was supplied with Quick Rig fittings and a flight case set up with link cables, DMX, etc as a complete package.

 

“We can wheel them out individually as they are, where and when we want them”, says Strachan. The additional Dalis 860 fixtures gave Strachan and his team the opportunity to “futureproof” the Ballet’s full scale shows, which will start with ‘The Nutcracker’ during the winter season tour 2021/22. “Not only can we now populate the top and bottom of cyc entirely with Dalis for maximum coverage in a traditional setting, but we also have the flexibility of the kind that arose when we filmed ‘Odyssey’”, says Strachan.

 

‘Odyssey’ is a new work choreographed by Scottish Ballet Soloist Nicholas Shoesmith. Directed by Ciaran Lyons, it was a short dance film that took viewers on a journey through a gaming landscape inhabited by otherworldly beings, where the real and virtual collide. Filmed during lockdown in a 20 m2 x 8 m high pop-up performance space in Scottish Ballet’s production area, the futuristic design proved an unconventional setting for Dalis 860. Strachan rigged 26 Dalis units vertically on the set truss, in full view of the cameras, where they became an integral part of the structure within the virtual area.

 

“Our initial assumption was that we would have to cover them with frost and conceal the units”, says Strachan, “but the TV Lighting Director asked for the covers to be removed as he wanted to see the lights themselves. We ended up making a feature of them on the structure for the camera looks and the TV team replaced the lighting they brought with them. It was great to use Dalis in a completely different way from what we actually purchased them for.” Scottish Ballet’s house MA2 lighting programmer, Kieran Kenning, created a series of designs to run up and down the face of the fixtures, making full use of their range of colours and programmability.

 

(Photos: Andrew Ross)

 

www.robertjuliat.fr

 

Robert Juliat Dalis 860 supplied to Scottish BalletRobert Juliat Dalis 860 supplied to Scottish Ballet

DiGiCo Quantum 338 at Montreux Jazz Festival 2021

DiGiCo Quantum 338 at Montreux Jazz Festival 2021
DiGiCo Quantum 338 at Montreux Jazz Festival 2021

For the past thirteen years, British console manufacturer DiGiCo has supported the Montreux Jazz Festival. For 2021, Montreux opted to deploy DiGiCo’s new Quantum 338.

 

The Festival has been held annually for the past 55 years on the banks of Lake Geneva in Switzerland. This year’s festival was a smaller affair and saw DiGiCo return once again with house consoles deployed across all the major stages.

 

A new focal point of the event was the Scene Du Lac which, for the first time in the festival’s history, saw one of its main stages entirely built in the lake itself. Here, a DiGiCo Quantum 338, SD-Rack and a 4REA4 sat at front of house, with an SD12 and SD-Rack taking on monitor duties.

 

(Photos: DiGiCo)

 

www.digico.biz

 

DiGiCo Quantum 338 at Montreux Jazz Festival 2021DiGiCo Quantum 338 at Montreux Jazz Festival 2021

Chauvet fixtures used for Alan Jackson benefit concert

Chauvet fixtures used for Alan Jackson benefit concert
Chauvet fixtures used for Alan Jackson benefit concert

This summer Alan Jackson stepped up to aid his hometown’s recovery effort from a category EF-4 tornado. Taking the stage at the Coweta County Fairgrounds in Newnan, Georgia, Jackson led a lineup of artists in the “Where I Come From Tornado Benefit Concert”.

 

In addition to raising over $2 million dollars to help people affected by the storm, the show was a celebration of hope in the wake of a disaster, as the country star performed his hits accompanied by iconic video images.

 

Accentuating the upbeat mood of the show and strengthening the connection of the 20,000 fans in attendance to Jackson’s performance was an immersive Mason Felps lighting design that featured 36 Rogue R2X Wash fixtures from Chauvet Professional.

 

Positioned on upstage “lighting ladders”, the high output moving fixtures, which, like the rest of the rig were supplied by Bandit Lites, were used to create a wall of light behind Jackson. “This was a hybrid of our touring rig designed for this benefit show”, says Felps. “Aside from lighting for the live audience, we also had to light for television since the show was carried on a local station.”

 

During the concert, the large LED wall was often used to show images from Jackson’s music videos. “Most of Alan’s music videos have a certain style or color to them, so I tried to match that as close as possible”, says Felps who served as the production manager for the show in addition to performing lighting design duties. He credits Alan Jackson manager Debbie Doebler and tour manager Nathan Baugh along with Chris Noll, Cody Cheetham and Courtney Stauffer from the Bandit crew for their contributions to making the show a success.

 

(Photos: Chauvet Professional)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

Chauvet fixtures used for Alan Jackson benefit concertChauvet fixtures used for Alan Jackson benefit concert

Corona: Special Stryke Percussion indoor show lit with Chauvet

Corona: Special Stryke Percussion indoor show lit with Chauvet
Corona: Special Stryke Percussion indoor show lit with Chauvet

As a result of protocols that restricted crew sizes in the wake of COVID, it became impossible for the Stryke Percussion ensemble to incorporate any props into the group’s latest show, entitled “When No One Is In The Room” and performed in an empty gymnasium as a safety precaution.

 

Nevertheless, the group was still able to deliver a performance rich in narrative quality thanks in large measure to a Clifford Michael Spulock lighting design that featured a collection of Chauvet Professional Maverick, Rogue and Colorado fixtures.

 

“These indoor percussion shows usually don’t go hand-in-hand with lighting, as they have big sets and other objects to tell their stories”, says Spulock. “Since that wasn’t possible in this case, they turned to lighting. I really drew on my background in theatre to advance the narrative in light.”

 

Just as he’s often done in theatre, Spulock used shadows and dark space as a storytelling device in the group’s video. During some solo performances, the film crew did 360-shots around the individual percussionist. “Matt Kuhlman and Judd Wood did a fantastic job capturing these nuances when editing and recording the video”, says Spulock. “We also got brilliant design input from Cisco Hance, Scott Hughes, and DC Gutierrez.”

 

“We had seven Rogue R2 Washes in the rig”, continues Spulock. “There were five behind the band that we used for backing lighting and areal effects and two behind the pit in from for front lighting and specials.”

 

With no rigging available, all of the lights in Spulock’s rig were arranged on the floor. The “most crucial” of these were the ten Colorado Batten 144 Tour fixtures, which he placed evenly on either side of the performance area. His rig also had two Rogue R1X Spot fixtures behind the band, and two Maverick MK2 Spot units for gobo and aerial effects.

 

(Photos: Chauvet Professional)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

Corona: Special Stryke Percussion indoor show lit with ChauvetCorona: Special Stryke Percussion indoor show lit with Chauvet

Elation IP line lights Château de Chambord for French TV show

On the French television show ‘La chanson de l’année’ (The Song of the Year) on station TF1, the French public get to choose their favorite French song of the past year. Produced by DMLS TV, this year’s show featured a château backdrop with lighting effects from Elation IP-rated luminaires.

 

For the show, aired live on June 5th, the Château de Chambord in the Loire Valley, provided the backdrop for lighting designer Frédéric Dorieux to showcase the competing acts. Dorieux had at his disposal 148 Proteus Hybrid arc-source moving heads and 140 Arena Zoom Q7 IP Par lights, both luminaires from Elation’s outdoor-rated IP65 line.

 

Dorieux used the Proteus Hybrids from ground positions, as well as from across the front parapet of the château. The Arena Zoom Q7 IPs uplit the Château and highlighted the surrounding gardens. Dushow TV supplied all of the lighting and audio for the show. Elation French distribution is by Best Audio & Lighting.

 

(Photos: Seb.N/Best Audio & Lighting/Elation Professional)

 

www.elationlighting.com

 

Louisville Orchestra and bluegrass band share Chauvet Independence Day rig

During this year’s Independence Day weekend in Louisville, Kentucky, a show by Greensky Bluegrass was followed by a July 4 performance by the Louisville Orchestra.

 

Taking place at the city’s Waterfront Park, the bluegrass and orchestral shows were supported by a rig anchored by 14 Maverick Storm 1 Wash and six Maverick MK3 Spot fixtures from Chauvet Professional.

 

Supplied by C&H Audio Visual Services (the event’s production company), the IP16 rated RGBW washes were evenly spaced across the 40-foot downstage truss. The 820-watt spot fixtures, which were rented from 4Wall Entertainment, were spaced throughout the upstage truss.

 

From these positions, the fixtures performed different functions for the bluegrass and classical music shows. For example, when Greensky Bluegrass performed on Friday and Saturday, the Storm 1 Washes bathed the band in an array of colors, while during the classical music concert on Sunday the 4th they washed the orchestra in 4200 Kelvin for the video cameras. The spots meanwhile were used for specials with the bluegrass band and then were counted on to create frost washes over the front rows of the orchestra.

 

Andrew Lincoln, the LD for Greensky Bluegrass, designed the rig; Alex Hicks created the light show for the Louisville Orchestra’s 90-minute performance which was followed by fireworks. Hicks, owner of Lucidum LLC, credits his L2 Johnny Blocker with helping him balance the varying needs of the production.

 

(Photos: Chauvet Professional/Frankie Steele)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

Henk-Jan van Beek setzt Lichtdesign beim Eurovision Song Contest mit Robe um

Die Produktionsbeleuchtung beim Eurovision Song Contest (ESC) 2021 in der Ahoy Arena in Rotterdam (Niederlande) wurde von LD Henk-Jan van Beek von Light-H-Art geleitet, der eng mit den Co-Designern Bas de Vries und Martin Beekhuizen zusammenarbeitete.

 

Neben der Entwicklung eines allgemeinen Beleuchtungsdesigns für die Show arbeiteten sie mit allen Delegationen für ihre individuellen Shows zusammen - viele hatten ihre eigenen beratenden Lichtdesigner und künstlerischen Leiter dabei - und kreierten 39 individuelle Auftritte innerhalb des Gesamtdesigns der Show.

 

Henk-Jan van Beek spezifizierte 740 x Robe Moving Lights für die Veranstaltung, die mehr als ein Drittel des gesamten, 1.782 aktive Scheinwerfer umfassenden Beleuchtungs-Riggs ausmachten. Das gesamte Lichtequipment der Veranstaltung - plus Audio und Rigging - wurde vom niederländischen Rental-Spezialisten Ampco Flashlight, dem offiziellen technischen Ausstatter des ESC 2021 für Licht, Audio und Rigging, geliefert.

 

Laut Dennis van der Haagen, operativer und kommerzieller Direktor von Ampco Flashlight, wurde das Unternehmen nach einem offiziellen europäischen Ausschreibungsverfahren ausgewählt, um - erstmalig - drei Bereiche der Produktion auszustatten. Der die Liste an Geräten von Robe Lighting bestand aus 396 x Spiider, 220 x LEDBeam 150, 92 x BMFL WashBeam und 25 x Tetra2-Moving-LED-Bars, plus 12 x BMFL FollowSpot LT, die über 12 x Robe RoboSpot-Remote-Follow-Spot-Systeme betrieben wurden.

 

Florian Wieders Set-Design mit einer auffälligen, durchscheinenden Haupt-LED-Leinwand und quecksilbrig wirkendem Videoboden war für Henk-Jan van Beek der Ausgangspunkt für die Gestaltung der Beleuchtung. Van Beek und Wieder waren sich zu Beginn des Design- und Planungsprozesses einig, dass die „strukturelle Integrität“ der Bühne durch die Beleuchtung widergespiegelt und verstärkt werden sollte, mit klaren Linien und großen dramatischen Leinwänden.

 

Das Set enthielt eine beachtliche Fläche an LED-Bildschirmen, die zusammen mit Augmented-Reality-Videoinhalten für einige Pausenauftritte zusätzlich ihre eigenen Lichteffekte erzeugten, welche mit den echten Scheinwerfern abgestimmt und synchronisiert werden mussten. Automatisierungselemente wie Drehtüren, Washlight-Pods, Fallarme und verschiedene andere bewegliche Teile halfen dabei, verschiedene architektonische Looks für die Bühne zu schaffen.

 

Die 396 Robe-Spiider-LED-Wash-Beams wurden auf 44 Pods im Dach verteilt, wobei neun davon pro „Flower-Pod“ über den gesamten Veranstaltungsort geflogen und als „riesige Wash-Lights“ eingesetzt wurden. Vierzehn dieser Pods befanden sich auf dem Automationssystem und direkt über der Hauptbühne. Die 220 LEDBeam 150 wurden um die Bildschirme der Haupt- und B-Bühne sowie als nach außen fächernde Bodenbeleuchtung für beide Bühnen eingesetzt. Fünfundzwanzig Robe Tetra2 wurden in den Bühnenboden eingebaut, direkt vor der Videoleinwand auf der Hauptbühne, um wirbelnde Effekte zu erzeugen.

 

Das Publikum (3.500 Personen waren zu den drei Fernsehveranstaltungen zugelassen) erhielt Sitzplätze in der ersten Reihe der seitlichen Tribünen, während der Green-Room auf den Boden der Arena verlegt wurde, so dass alle Künstler und Delegationen quasi auch zum Teil des Publikums wurden. Um diesen Bereich zu beleuchten, wurden die ursprünglichen Pläne (aus dem Jahr 2020, in dem der ESC pandemiebedingt ausfiel) überarbeitet und die 92 x BMFL WashBeam sowie die BMFL FollowSpot LT (Long Throws) an den Traversen für die Front-, Publikums- und Green-Room-Beleuchtung des gesamten Raums angebracht. Dadurch wurde gewährleistet, dass alle Nahaufnahmen im Green-Room eingefangen und sauber für die Kamera ausgeleuchtet werden konnten.

 

Ein Teil des gesamten Remote-FollowSpot-Systems des ESC bestand aus vierzehn Robe-RoboSpot-Remote-FollowSpot-Controllern (ein Follow-Me-System wurde ebenfalls bei der Veranstaltung eingesetzt). Zwölf davon, eine Mischung aus BMFL WashBeam und BMFL FollowSpot, liefen im Multi-Device-Modus mit MotionCams und zwei BMFL FollowSpot, die als Key Lights vor der Bühne eingesetzt wurden. Ampco Flashlights Lead-Systems-Techniker für die ferngesteuerten FollowSpots war Dennis Berkhout. Die gesamte Showbeleuchtung wurde von zehn GrandMA3-Pulten am FOH gesteuert, die in drei Sessions über Art-Net liefen und über ein vollständig redundantes Netzwerk verbunden waren, das auch die 26 Kameras und die DMX-RDM-Daten bediente.

 

Zu van Beeks Team von Lichtprogrammierern und -operatoren gehörten Joost Wijgers, Key-Light-Programmierer und Assistent des Lichtdesigners, sowie Micky Dordregter, Programmierer für die Hauptbeleuchtung der Show, beide von Light-H-Art. Außerdem waren die Showlichtprogrammierer Andre Beekmans, Robbert-Jan Vernooij und Erik-Jan Berendsen, der Nachtschichtprogrammierer Bas Geersema und der Previz- und DMX-Kameraprogrammierer Emillio Galluzo für die Beleuchtung verantwortlich. Bart van Stiphout war der Einleuchter.

 

(Fotos: Ralph Larmann)

 

www.robelighting.de

 

James Baker lights „Pippin“ with Chauvet

James Baker lights „Pippin“ with Chauvet

James Baker designed the lightshow for a production of the „Pippin“ musical at Riverview High School in Oakmont, Pennsylvania. At Baker’s disposal was an all LED rig featuring Chauvet Professional Maverick and Ovation fixtures supplied by Star Design Event Services.

 

“For the concept of this show, we were playing with contrasting ideas, such as light/bright and dark/shadows, to symbolize the inner conflicts faced by Pippin”, he explains. “Our ensemble members assumed the role of phantoms trying to manipulate the thoughts in his head. We had this LED star curtain that we used in a way to symbolize and demonstrate how light can cut through even the darkest of thoughts.”

 

The Ovation E-260WW ellipsoidal fixtures in the rig were critical to helping Baker achieve this vision. Positioned on house pipes to the left and right of his tech book, the warm white units provided key lighting and illuminated the passerelle, which was used often throughout the show.

 

Adding extra depth and dimensionality were the six Maverick Storm 1 Wash fixtures in the „Pippin“ rig. “The Mavericks played an integral part in the design of the show”, says Baker. “We placed two of them in the house and used them to create mysterious and shadow-filled atmospheres. These fixtures were also utilized for several specials and color washes. Our four other Mavericks were placed at the end of batons on stage and were used to create various shadow, side, and backlight looks.”

 

(Photos: Chauvet Professional)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

James Baker lights „Pippin“ with ChauvetJames Baker lights „Pippin“ with Chauvet

Adam Hall unterstützt Ben-Böhmer-Livestream aus dem Kliemannsland

Bei einem kürzlichen Livestream von DJ Ben Böhmer aus dem Kliemannsland, einem von Fynn Kliemann gegründeten Kreativ- und Eventspace in Niedersachsen, kamen zahlreiche Produkte der Adam Hall Group zum Einsatz.

 

Das Setting war so dabei ungewöhnlich wie der Ort des Geschehens, denn erst während Böhmer auflegte, bauten Kliemann und sein Team die Bühne um den DJ herum. Dabei kam Eventtechnik von Cameo, LD Systems, Gravity und Defender zum Einsatz.

 

Insgesamt wurden für den Livestream 14 Cameo-Zenit-P100-DTW-Outdoor-LED-PAR-Scheinwerfer, zwei Zenit-W600-Outdoor-Washlights, drei Auro-Spot-300-Moving-Heads sowie zwei Cameo-F4-D-Fresnel-Spotlights mit Tageslicht-LED und ein kompaktes F1-T-Tungsten-Spotlight verwendet. Für Atmosphäre sorgten zudem Cameo-Nebelmaschinen. Da es sich beim Kliemannsland um einen weitläufigen Abenteuerspielplatz und keine klassische Veranstaltungs-Location handelt, mussten Kabel möglichst sicher über Defender-Kabelbrücken verlegt werden und unter anderem einen umherfahrenden Bier-Bagger aushalten.

 

Die Beschallung des Live-Acts übernahmen zwei LD-Systems-Maui-44-G2-Säulen-PA-Systeme, für das DJ-Monitoring in der selbst errichteten Kanzel kamen zwei aktive Icoa-12-A-Koaxial-Lautsprecher zum Einsatz. Was nicht auf dem Boden, an Rigs oder anderweitig befestigt wurde - etwa Scheinwerfer, Lautsprecher oder Mikrofone (LD-Systems-U508-HHD-2-Dual-Funkmikrofonsystem) - stand auf diversen Gravity-Stativen.

 

(Fotos: Adam Hall Group/Kliemannsland)

 

www.adamhall.com

 

Robe T2 Profiles specified for ‘Zodiac The Musical’

‘Zodiac The Musical’ is a new musical produced by Peet Nieuwenhuijsen, directed by William Spaaij and staged at the Koepelgevangenis, a former prison in Breda, The Netherlands. Lighting designer Marc Heinz was among a team working under the technical production umbrella of Unlimited Productions - also based in Breda - helping to deliver this new work.

 

He and technical production manager Michiel van der Zijde - representing Unlimited Productions together with Jeffrey Kranen and Luc Huisman - also designed the set, and Heinz specified 32 of Robe’s new T2 Profile fixtures for the project, together with 50 x Robe Spiider LED wash beams and assorted other lighting fixtures.

 

Thirty-eight LED screens are dotted around the upper levels, with over 70 drones - provided by Dronisos from France - joining the cast. With original plans unavailable and no records existing in the municipality, a full 3D laser scan survey of the building was completed - needed for the UV-mapping of the projections - and followed by a rope access examination of the roof construction conducted by the Unlimited Productions team to ascertain the roof weight loading capacities which were judged to be “extremely little”.

 

They received the go-ahead to remove around 1000 kg of old house lighting and associated steel detritus from the roof which freed up just enough capacity to rig a very small top centre circular truss at the top - which is rigged with the 12 x Robe Spiiders. These are bright enough to reach the stage 30 metres below for a general layer of wash lighting, and light enough to be safe. The only other flown element is an “eye” set piece which flies in and out. It was also necessary to remove the old house lighting to get a clear path for the 7 x 20K projectors rigged in seven prison cells on level four, spaced out around the 52.5-metre roof circumference. Everything else had to be ground or side supported.

 

Michiel van der Zijde, Marc Heinz and Ruud de Deugd (head rigger and production structural engineer) produced the 8 x curved leg spider-like ground support structure design which connects to a 15-metre diameter circular truss in the middle positioned 12 metres above the central performance. This provides close lighting positions for the main performance space which is 14 metres in diameter complete with a double revolve stage.

 

Being a prison, Koepelgevangenis has only one small entrance/exit and that’s not even enough to reverse an artic, so all the production kit had to be unloaded outside and hand-carried inside. Once the rigging and set were solid, Marc Heinz and his assistant designer Jordy Veenstra began properly assessing the lighting needs having joined the project towards the end of 2020.

 

Twenty Robe T2s are fixed to the steel beams around the main interior wall, each individually attached to the building by rope access riggers. A rope sits next to each light so it can be lowered for service. The other 12 x T2 Profiles are on the top circle of the spider ground support, positioned for closer front lighting.

 

Twenty-two Robe Spiiders are on the spider (ground support) structure. These and the T2s also on there are accessed via a person lift as it is fully loaded with lights, so no climbing is possible. Access for getting the lift in position was also a consideration when positioning the seating and staging. Sixteen Spiiders are attached to the balcony around the third level of cells, used for washing the venue’s dome and supporting the projections, with the final 12 on the top circular truss right up on the roof.

 

All 92 moving lights - including all the T2 Profiles and Spiiders - are working in conjunction with a Follow Me automated followspot system which is at the heart of the design. All the show’s lighting is being supplied by Events Light, who were among the first in Europe to receive the T2 Profile.

 

Lighting control is via a Road Hog Full Boar console programmed by Jasper Nijholt. Projectors and media servers were programmed by Ruben Boogaard, and since the show premiered on 5th July, both lights and video are being operated by Pascal Schutijser. It is a mix of timecode for the large production numbers, but mostly manually operated lighting cues according to visual line-of-sight. Audio is designed by Jeroen ten Brinke. The video design is by Arjen Klerkx and content created by Anouk Steenbakkers and Joost Gulien.

 

(Photos: Paul Clarke/Louise Stickland)

 

www.robe.cz

 

Astera AX3s in cross border collaboration

An illuminated trail of 105 x Astera AX3 “beacons” fitted with custom firmware from the manufacturer was set up along a 58-kilometre stretch of the Danish/German border as part of ‘Genforeningen 2020’, a series of events celebrating the centenary of the reunification of Southern Jutland with the kingdom of Denmark.

 

The event was captured on film and camera by various drones, aircraft and ground-based photographers, videographers and members of the public along the way, whose images were hash-tagged and posted on social media.

 

Technical production and rental specialist All Stage ApS, based in Varde, was approached by the Barbara Simonsen Theatre in Aarhus to assist in the realisation of this lighting installation project. The border of beacons was designed by Line Lybek Witt from the Theatre and All Stage ApS’s Anders Kruse, and organised by Teater Seachange. It was originally planned for 2020, but postponed due to the pandemic.

 

The 105 x AX3s were placed along the route on 105 specially selected - and accessible - border stones out of the 280 that mark the boundary between Denmark and Germany. When darkness fell on May 8th, the boundary was lit up and energized in a line of snaking lights extending from Skomagerhus in the east to the Wadden Sea in the west.

 

The biggest challenge was control. All 105 AX3s needed to switch on simultaneously at 21:30 exactly on the night - and the range of the Astera controller didn’t stretch to the full 58 kilometers length of the border. Anders Kruse contacted Jonas Dam from Astera’s Danish distributor Light Partner who in turn contacted Simon Canins and Jesper Soerensen, and together they decided on the addition of some custom firmware uploaded to each AX3, ensuring all lights to be switched on at the correct time.

 

(Photos: All Stage ApS/Emilie Gadeberg)

 

www.astera-led.com

 

The Criminal Chaos utilize Chauvet fixtures for music video

The Criminal Chaos utilize Chauvet fixtures for music video
The Criminal Chaos utilize Chauvet fixtures for music video

Italian rock band The Criminal Chaos recorded their latest music video at Fumasoli Audio & Lights Rental’s studio in northern Italy’s Aosta Valley. Patick Iavarone designed the lightshow for this production.

 

Making ample use of shadows to add a sense of mystery to the recordings, Iavarone pierced these dark spaces with bright, boldly colored light, often in monochromatic hues. Providing these illuminations were 32 Chauvet Professional Maverick fixtures from Fumasoli’s own inventory.

 

Iavarone arranged eight Maverick MK2 Wash and four Maverick MK2 Spot fixtures on the upstage truss, and eight washes on the middle truss, as well as four spot units on the downstage truss. He also positioned four of the Maverick washes and an equal number of spots on the floor on the studio’s 10-meter by 7-meter stage. The studio itself measures 20 meters by 10 meters, providing a variety of camera angles for video and livestream sessions.

 

From these positions, Iavarone lit the five band members from side and back angles to accentuate the haunting atmosphere of the video. “The concept by the designer and the band was to have a lot of back lighting”, says Marco Zaffuto of Fumasoli Audio & Light Rental. “The use of front lighting was kept to a minimum.”

 

The Mavericks in the rig worked in close concert with a center stage video wall. Back light angles and video images flowed through a continuous series of changes throughout the seven song video.

 

(Photos: Chauvet Professional)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

The Criminal Chaos utilize Chauvet fixtures for music videoThe Criminal Chaos utilize Chauvet fixtures for music video

ChamSys console used for 100th anniversary celebration of Third Silesian Uprising

ChamSys console used for 100th anniversary celebration of Third Silesian Uprising

Michal Hyra was chosen to light the grand finale of the two-month long celebration of Tryptyk powstanczy - pamiec ziemi in Bytom, Poland, which marked the 100th anniversary of the Third Silesian Uprising.

 

Hyra’s lighting design engrossed the large crowd gathered in Bytom’s historic Market Square as well as those watching the livestream of one of the most important events in Poland. His design was focused on the traditional Polish folk dancers on stage. Later in the evening, when the initial performers were replaced by a rock band, he created a tour-like show.

 

Hyra used a ChamSys Magic MQ 500 Stadium console to run his 8-universe show. “Due to heavy rain, we had to program the whole show with only a reduced number of dancers, our director Karolina Widera and our LD Pawel Murlik present. We had to listen to a partial rehearsal from the day before to figure things out.”

 

“Since we didn’t have a real dress rehearsal, a whole bunch of stuff like strips and front lights had to be busked outside of the main cue stack”, he adds. “Not to mention that second part of the whole show was a rock concert, which I busked.”

 

(Photos: ChamSys)

 

www.chamsysusa.com

 

ChamSys console used for 100th anniversary celebration of Third Silesian UprisingChamSys console used for 100th anniversary celebration of Third Silesian Uprising

RCF-Komponenten bei Monheimer Open-Air-Saison-Start im Einsatz

Die Stadt Monheim am Rhein ist mit der Monheimer Kulturwerke GmbH in die Open-Air-Saison gestartet. Im Rahmen der Aktionstage „Gartenzwerg grüßt Gänseliesel“ fand unter anderem ein Auftritt von Culcha Candela auf dem Schützenplatz in Monheim statt. Für den Sound für das „Picknick-Konzert“ zeichnete Christofer Kaufmann von Tontechnik Kaufmann verantwortlich, der hierfür aktive Komponenten des italienischen Herstellers RCF einsetzte.

 

Ursprünglich als Drive-in-Konzert geplant, entschloss sich der Veranstalter durch die entspannte Corona-Lage dazu, das Konzert als Picknick-Konzert durchzuführen. So konnten 500 Menschen in zugewiesenen Arealen eines der ersten größeren Open-Airs erleben. Das Publikumsareal war aufgrund der Abstandsregeln knapp 100 Meter lang.

 

Für die Beschallung des Publikums kamen als Line Array rechts und links der Bühne je zehn Module des aktiven 3-Wege-RCF-Modells HDL 50-A 4K zum Einsatz. Die 4K-Modelle liefern mit ihren Class-D-Endstufen 4.000 W (RMS) Leistung und einen Schalldruckpegel von 143 dB.

 

Weitere HDL-30-A-Line-Array-Module dienten als Frontfill bzw. Outfill auf den Bässen. 18 x Sub-9007-AS-Bässe im Cardioid-Modus sorgten für Druck in den tiefen Frequenzen. Auf der Bühne kamen 2 x TT 25, mit 8003 als Sidefill, 2 x TT 22 MK2 mit Sub 8006 als DJ-Monitor und sechs weitere TT-25-SMA-Monitore als Stage-Monitore zum Einsatz.

 

(Fotos: dB Technologies)

 

www.dbtechnologies.de

 

Kristof Van Mensel selects Astera for Scala & Kolacny Brothers

Kristof Van Mensel selects Astera for Scala & Kolacny Brothers
Kristof Van Mensel selects Astera for Scala & Kolacny Brothers

Kristof Van Mensel from Belgium-based lighting and visual design company TCF (The Creative Factory) is the long term lighting designer for the Scala & Kolacny Brothers women’s choir. He regularly incorporates Astera fixtures into their live show designs, especially the AX3.

 

“I ensconce them in the set and have also used AX3s on occasions as hand-held lighting effects for the artists”, says Van Mensel, whose association with Astera started about five years ago when Controllux became the Belgian distributor and contacted him to show the range of products. Now they are one of his key creative tools.

 

Van Mensel and TCF also designed lighting for the opening ceremony of a new market place shopping area in the Belgian city of Sint Truiden, a show featuring dancers and interactive water fountains, where he used AX3s to enhance the motion and flow of the dancers and the water.

 

AX3s also provided a solution for a tour with Belgian new wave band The Arch. More recently, Van Mensel has started using Astera Titan Tubes as artist floor packages onstage and for TV productions. He has also used Titan Tubes to illuminate the drum kit of drummer and e-drummer Michael Schack, among others. Since the pandemic, Van Mensel and his colleagues at TCF have been busy lighting live streams plus AR, VR and XR broadcast events.

 

(Photos: Scala & Kolacny Brothers/The city of Sint Truiden/Andreas Gijbels/Medialounge.be)

 

www.astera-led.com

 

Kristof Van Mensel selects Astera for Scala & Kolacny BrothersKristof Van Mensel selects Astera for Scala & Kolacny Brothers

Corona: Martin Audio supports return of Japan Jam 2021

Japan Jam 2021 took place at Soga Sports Park in Chiba over the country’s big May public holiday weekend. The annual event, which has already taken place three times at this venue, had to be cancelled last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic - therefore, this was the first event in two years, and it was held under strict infection control conditions.

 

Last time around, more than 30,000 people participated daily in the festival; however, this year the number was limited to 10,000 per day, and the event was devoid of alcohol. The audience needed to obey the rules such as wearing masks and were able to enjoy the live performance in 1 m square frames arranged in front of the stage.

 

As in previous years, Martin Audio MLA was adopted as the main speaker, with ten MLA elements (including an MLD Downfill) and three stacks of subwoofers, nine per side in total, on main stage, with the middle sub rear-facing for the cardioid pattern. In addition, four WPM were equipped as front fill/outfill.

 

Many precautions were taken to avoid infection. “The microphones that would normally have been reused, were completely replaced”, says Bunshiro Hote of sound rental company MSI Japan Tokyo. “As a result, we used five lines (including spares) to operate only the announcements. We introduced a UV irradiation desiccator for some mics that needed to be used by multiple people, while the console was sanitised every time the sound engineer changed. All microphones (vocal mics for the artistes and talkback mics for the engineers) were regulated.”

 

“Regarding COVID, Tokyo was in a state of emergency and as a neighbouring prefecture, Chiba also needed to prevent the spread of infection. It made us more nervous and considerate of noise complaints than usual”, continues Hote, who was also in charge of the system design. “When we did the sound check, we played the CD at 100 dBA at FOH, and prepared three delay settings of 60 m, 70 m, and 80 m from the stage for the main MLA area, and assessed to what degree it could be heard at the monitoring point outside the venue. As a result, we chose the 70 m pattern as the standard in the three-stage MLA area, and since the Lotus Stage was the nearest to the street, we started this at 60 m.”

 

(Photos: Rockin’on Group official)

 

www.martin-audio.com

 

Chauvet Rogue fixtures chosen for Pigeons Playing Ping Pong live show

For jam band Pigeons Playing Ping Pong’s two-set gig at the Avondale Brewing Company in Birmingham, Alabama, lighting designer Manny Newman specified 18 Chauvet Professional Rogue fixtures in the band’s own touring rig.

 

He arranged six Rogue R1 Spot fixtures across a 16-foot truss as part of the ground package, and hung twelve Rogue R1 Wash units on four Global Truss Quick Grids. Working this road package with the house rig, he unleashed a stream of looks across the stage’s backdrop that invited imagination.

 

“Usually during the second set I like to do psych looks on the back wall for certain jams”, says Newman. “At Avondale, I did this with light and gobos rather than video, because I don’t like to shoot media in people’s faces. I want people to create their own mental image of what a song means to them. For example: when we play the song ‘Poseidon’, any normal video guy would probably do something with waves or an actual image of Poseidon, but in my case, I don’t want to, because Poseidon might mean something completely different to the listener. It may represent something deep in that person’s life.”

 

Newman also made liberal use of white during the show, sometimes using it to envelop the band in a fan of light. “During peaks of jams I tend to go all white”, he says. “I like to look at the progression of brightness like the fret board of a guitar. As the musician is going up in the fretboard, the notes get higher as well as brighter. For me, I like to complement that from darker to brighter with dimmer and color. So, white is the natural choice for the peak of the jam.”

 

(Photos: Kendall McCargo)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

Bryson Tiller XR concert created with Robe

Xite Labs - founded in 2018 by visual and production design specialists Greg Russell and Vello Virkhaus - was approached by director Mike Carson and The 92 Group to assist in the production of XR environments for singer, rapper, and songwriter Bryson Tiller who recently recorded an XR concert - for later broadcast - in Calabasas, California at Xite Labs’ XR stage facility.

 

Xite received a detailed brief with a set of storyboard images and a flow concept of the four dynamic worlds that they wanted to build. The 3D spaces were created by multiple artists using Unreal Engine and Notch. For the shoot, the physical studio design comprised three sides - including a back wall - of LED, an LED floor with rear lights at high angles following the back wall curve, plus several front and side filler lights.

 

Two cameras were involved, one mounted on a tripod and one on the end of a human-operated 12 ft arm crane. The crane camera was fitted with a Canon 18-105 lens, and a Stype Red Spy optical camera tracking system. The secondary camera had a long lens and was offset to the left of the main LED screen and used for a range of classic static telephoto looks.

 

The Robe Tetra2s were used for side fills, the T1 Profiles and BMFL Blades were rigged in the front and high side lighting positions, while the SuperSpikies were at the back. All of these provided light on Tiller that closely mirrored the activity of the richly contrasting environments.

 

The BMFL Blades were brought in as an extra by DoP Russ Fraser and used to side light the artist and create patterns and light movement. A GrandMA2 system was used for control, with lighting and video cues timecoded for synchronicity between the creative and narrative events. A total of 14 songs were recorded.

 

Lighting equipment was supplied by Russ Fraser Films and the production company was HPLA with Bryson Tiller, Ryan Hahn, and Neil Dominique as executive producers. Mike Carson was the show director, and the overall creative direction was a collaboration between Vello Virkhaus and Greg Russel, Amish Dani, and Sam Ashcroft. Lighting director was Mike Robertson from Lightswitch who also did the timecode pre-programming and show file setup, and the D3 server operator was Simon Anaya.

 

(Photos: Billy Woods/Xite Labs)

 

www.robe.cz

 

DiGiCo Quantum 7s support BRITS 2021

DiGiCo Quantum 7s support BRITS 2021
DiGiCo Quantum 7s support BRITS 2021

This year’s BRIT Awards was a landmark event for live music. As part of a government-led research programme to assess how mass-participation events can safely resume, a socially distanced audience of 4,000, consisting mainly of NHS key workers, took their seats at London’s O2 Arena for the first indoor live music event in the UK since the beginning of the pandemic.

 

DiGiCo consoles were once again deployed at both front of house and monitor positions by the show’s long-time audio supplier, Britannia Row Productions. Britannia Row’s Josh Lloyd took on the audio design and FOH artist mixes, with Chris Coxhead in charge of presenter audio and Colin Pink assuming his recurring role as Live Sound Supervisor.

 

“We had a DiGiCo Quantum 7 dealing with the music at FOH and a mirrored pair of SD12s looking after the presenter needs”, explains Pink. “At monitors we also had two Quantum 7s dealing with the artists mixes.” Performing live and mixed by Lloyd were Olivia Rodrigo, Dua Lipa, Griff, Headie One, Arlo Parks, The Weeknd and Elton John with Years & Years, while Rag’n’Bone Man’s duet with P!nk was mixed by Rob Sadler. This was the first year that Quantum consoles were used exclusively for the bands. 

 

Lloyd’s FOH set up also included three SD Racks, an Orange Box and an Optocore I/O box, affording him integration with Waves, MADI and AES via the fibre optic loop. Nico Antonietti and Dan Ungaretti manned the SD12 monitor consoles, each of which was connected to two SD Racks, one for band inputs and one for RF mics and playback.

 

Both engineers had worked on previous editions of the event and used an existing show file as the basis for their set up, which they adapted according to the requests of the individual artists. These were saved as presets with each artist being allocated a Snapshot to avoid loading different show files during changeovers, a protocol which also helped to minimise any potential contamination.

 

(Photos: DiGiCo)

 

www.digico.biz

 

DiGiCo Quantum 7s support BRITS 2021DiGiCo Quantum 7s support BRITS 2021